Monsenso enters partnership with psychiatric clinic in Greece

Monsenso enters partnership with psychiatric clinic in Greece

Monsenso has entered into a partnership agreement with the Greek psychiatric clinic Tzeranis Psychis Omma to deploy the solution in their clinic from Q2 2022 and drive market expansion of the Monsenso solution on the Greek market.

In 2019, 18% of the Greek population was living with a mental illness [1] – since then, the Covid-19 pandemic has led to a significant rise in mental health problems [2]. At the “Meeting of Minds on Quality of Care” conference hosted by WHO/Europe in Athens in December 2021, the necessity to “improve the quality of mental health care for children and adolescents” was emphasised, particularly in light of the Covid 19 pandemic [3]. Greek officials have further highlighted the significance of patient-centricity in mental health services in particular [2].

Psychis Omma has supported individuals with psychological and psychiatric illnesses for over 50 years, aiming at “offering a better life for people suffering from mental disorders, both to themselves and their families” [4]. The clinic provides both inpatient hospitalisation in their facilities in Nea Penteli, close to Athens, as well as (online) psychological support services and external observation [4]. 

The Monsenso Digital Health Solution will be implemented in Psychis Omma’s clinical practice as a tool to support patients in their treatment pathway and to facilitate early intervention and crisis reduction. Moreover, Psychis Omma Mental Health Solutions will act as a partner of Monsenso in Greece, advocating for the benefits of using digital support tools in mental health settings and actively marketing the Monsenso solution on the Greek market.

The Monsenso app for individuals helps patients to keep track of their well-being, symptoms, and medication intake through self-reported data, as well as their behaviour through sensor data collected on mobile phones. The historical data is visualised and helps individuals remember how they have been doing, e.g. between support sessions. It also helps them gain better insight into the behaviours that trigger their symptoms, empowering them to better manage their condition. Healthcare providers access the user data via a web portal for professionals, enabling them to see fluctuations in the mental state of the patients. This can help to predict relevant outcomes and reduce potential relapses and readmissions.

We are excited to bring the Monsenso Solution to Greece and work with Psychis Omma as a partner who values enabling people with mental illnesses to live better, more independent lives as highly as we do.”, says Thomas Lethenborg, CEO of Monsenso.

We are looking forward to working with Monsenso as a partner in Greece and to using their digital health solution to offer improved treatment support to more patients. Remote patient monitoring will open new doors to us in terms of our capabilities to actively support individuals outside of treatment sessions.”, says Spyros Tzeranis, Scientific Director of Tzeranis Psychis Omma.

About Tzeranis Psychis Omma 
Tzeranis Psychis Omma is a Greek Neuropsychiatric Clinic founded in 1971, providing specialist health services and supporting individuals with various psychological and psychiatric illnesses. Working with highly experienced and trained nursing and medical staff, the clinic offering both inpatient care and external psychological support aims at enabling more individuals suffering from mental illness to live better lifes.
To learn more visit tzeranis.gr.

About Monsenso
Monsenso is an innovative technology company offering a medical grade digital health solution. Our mission is to help provide better mental health to more people at lower costs. Our solution helps optimise the treatment of mental disorders and gives a detailed overview of an individual’s mental health through the collection of outcome, adherence, and behavioural data. It connects individuals, carers, and health care providers to enable personalised treatment, remote care, and early intervention. Based on continuous research and development, our team is committed to developing solutions that fit seamlessly into the lives of individuals, increase their quality of life and improve the efficacy of mental health treatment. To learn more, visit www.monsenso.com

[1] Stewart, C. (2021). Europe: mental disorders among adolescents in 2019, by country. Statista. https://www-statista-com.esc-web.lib.cbs.dk:8443/statistics/1273254/mental-disorders-among-adolescents-in-europe-by-country/

[2] WHO (2021). Athens Mental Health Summit – Ministers and representatives renew commitment to prioritize mental health in the WHO European Region.
https://www.euro.who.int/en/countries/greece/news/news/2021/8/athens-mental-health-summit-ministers-and-representatives-renew-commitment-to-prioritize-mental-health-in-the-who-european-region

[3] WHO (2021). WHO/Europe and Greece put quality of care at the top of the health agenda. https://www.euro.who.int/en/countries/greece/news/news/2021/12/whoeurope-and-greece-put-quality-of-care-at-the-top-of-the-health-agenda

[4] Psychis Omma Tzeranis Clinic (n.d.). Our Clinic. https://tzeranis.gr/en/our-clinic/

Norddjurs municipality in Denmark joins a successful back-to-work program supported by the Monsenso digital health solution

Norddjurs municipality in Denmark joins a successful back-to-work program supported by the Monsenso digital health solution

Norddjurs Municipality in the Central Jutland region joins the successful Return-to-Work program, facilitated by several partners including Empano, Sundinvest, Den Sociale Kapitalfond, AS3, PWC and supported by Monsenso’s digital health solution. From February 2022, Monsenso’s digital health solution will be deployed in Norddjurs Municipality to support individuals during their return-to-work process, while collecting real-world insights on outcomes.

The impact of COVID -19 on social care.
The disruption or shutdown of critical mental health services during the COVID -19 pandemic has led to the rapid adoption of technology-enabled care (TEC) in both health care and adult social care (ASC). Today, there is no doubt that digital technologies offer the potential to improve social care, from targeting resources where they are most needed to promote independence in the community through remote care and treatment support.

Commissioning beyond COVID -19
The adoption of technology-enabled care (TEC) also provides an opportunity to move towards a more person-centered and evidence-based model of commissioning that focuses on service delivery outcomes.

Three forward-thinking municipalities in Denmark implement an outcome-based back-to-work service provided by Empano and Monsenso

To date, two forward-thinking municipalities in Denmark (Guldborgsund and Slagelse) have implemented an outcome-based back-to-work service provided by Empano and Monsenso.

The back-to-work services are designed to help citizens with mental illness return to the labour market faster and consist of coping and motivational courses provided by Empano, offered in conjunction with the Monsenso digital health solution for remote treatment support and real wold data collection on outcomes to validate and demonstrate program effectiveness. 

Since February 2022, Norddjurs municipality in the Central Jutland region has also joined the successful program and more municipalities are expected to follow during the year.

About Monsenso
Monsenso is an innovative technology company offering a medical grade digital health solution. Our mission is to help provide better mental health to more people at lower costs. Our solution helps optimise the treatment of mental disorders and gives a detailed overview of an individual’s mental health through the collection of outcome, adherence, and behavioural data. It connects individuals, carers, and health care providers to enable personalised treatment, remote care, and early intervention. Based on continuous research and development, our team is committed to developing solutions that fit seamlessly into the lives of individuals, increase their quality of life and improve the efficacy of mental health treatment.

To learn more, visit www.monsenso.com

Mental health in an unequal world. World Mental Health Day 2021

Mental health in an unequal world. World Mental Health Day 2021

Mental illness, why bother if all goes well? Because the day it hits you or your loved ones, you may be faced with the harsh reality of “Mental Health in an unequal world”. Close to 1 billion people globally are living with a mental disorder. Yet, countries spend on avg. 2% of their national health budgets on mental health leaving a disproportionate gap between demand for mental health services and supply. Each year, October 10th marks the “World Mental Health Day”. This year the theme is “Mental Health in an Unequal World”. 

Originally chosen by the World Federation for Mental Health, the theme Mental Health in an Unequal World” refers to the inequality in access to health services in low- and middle-income countries, where between 75% and 95% of patients with mental disorders have no access to mental health services at all. Despite the universal nature and the magnitude of mental illness, the gap between demand for mental health services and supply remains substantial.

The global pandemic along with the climate crisis and social disarrangement lead the world to a difficult place. To date, the pandemic is impacting people of all ages and backgrounds: Illness, economic impact, job insecurity, and most importantly, physical distancing leading to social isolation and millions of people facing mental health issues.

  • Close to one billion people have a mental disorder and anyone can be affected.
  • Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Globally, an estimated 5% of adults suffer from depression.
  • Globally, one in seven 10-19-year-olds suffers from a mental disorder. Half of all such disorders begin by the age of 14, but most go undiagnosed and untreated.
  • People with severe mental disorders like schizophrenia typically die 10-20 years earlier than the general population.
  • One in 100 deaths is by suicide. It is the fourth leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29.
  • The COVID -19 pandemic has had a significant impact on people’s mental health.

The World Federation for Mental Health also addresses the disparity between mental health investment and overall health. On average, countries spend only 2% of their national health budgets on mental health. This has changed little in recent years. Despite the scale of mental illness, the gap between demand for mental health services and supply remains substantial. Unaddressed mental health issues are now a leading global cause of disability and suffering. Yet only 10% receive “adequate” treatment – 75% receive no treatment at all.

The limited global availability of effective mental health treatments and a lack of objective measures of response to treatment, are some of the barriers in advancing patient outcomes. To reduce burden, it is critical to diagnose and monitor mood disorders using widely accessible, less costly, and scalable methods, which can enable a higher degree of specificity in mental health diagnoses and timely detection of clinical deterioration.

Building on the widespread adoption of smartphones, mobile health (mhealth) has gained significant interest as a means for capturing continuous, objectively observable and measurable data of patients’ behaviour and mental state. The data collected on smartphones and sensors represent a new approach aimed at measuring human behaviour and mental health, and thus an opportunity of detecting, assessing, and monitoring psychiatric disorders in a less costly and less burdensome way for the clinician.

The data collected on the smartphone are also referred to as digital biomarkers. These can be collected both passively through inbuilt sensors on the smartphone (physical activity and geolocation, social activity, text messages usage, phone usage, voice and speech pattern or wearables (sleep and activity), and actively via user engagement through self-monitored data/self-assessment data (mood, sleep, stress, medicine adherence).

By collecting this data between physician visits, clinicians can see fluctuations in patients’ mental states, providing a more holistic representation of the patient’s functioning over time. The data hereby offer the opportunity for clinicians to predict relevant outcomes in mood disorders and can thus serve as a tool of triage enabling to provide timely and preventative support to the individuals in critical need.

This approach, also known as digital-enabled psychiatry, has gained considerable interest and been extensively researched over the past decade to offer more people access to high-quality health and social care.

To learn more, visit our Research section here or watch a video on the opportunity of digital-enabled psychiatry from the Week of Health and Innovation conference 2021 in Denmark.

References:

https://wfmh.global/2021-world-mental-health-global-awareness-campaign-world-mental-health-day-theme/

https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240031029

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-mental-health-day/2021

https://www.who.int/key-messages

[1] https://www.who.int/gho/publications/world_health_statistics/EN_WHS2012_Full.pdf

[2] The size and burden of mental disorders and other disorders of the brain in Europe 2010. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2011

[3] OECD – 2015

[4] Economist Intelligence Unit – 2015

Mental health in an unequal world. World Mental Health Day 2021

Mental health in an unequal world. World Mental Health Day 2021

Mental illness, why bother if all goes well? Because the day it hits you or your loved ones, you may be faced with the harsh reality of “Mental Health in an unequal world”. Close to 1 billion people globally are living with a mental disorder. Yet, countries spend on avg. 2% of their national health budgets on mental health leaving a disproportionate gap between demand for mental health services and supply. Each year, October 10th marks Worlds Mental Health Day. This year the theme is “Mental Health in an Unequal World”. 

Originally chosen by the World Federation for Mental Health, the theme Mental Health in an Unequal World” refers to the inequality in access to health services in low- and middle-income countries, where between 75% and 95% of patients with mental disorders have no access to mental health services at all. Despite the universal nature and the magnitude of mental illness, the gap between demand for mental health services and supply remains substantial.

The global pandemic along with the climate crisis and social disarrangement lead the world to a difficult place. To date, the pandemic is impacting people of all ages and backgrounds: Illness, economic impact, job insecurity, and most importantly, physical distancing leading to social isolation and millions of people facing mental health issues.

  • Close to one billion people have a mental disorder and anyone can be affected.
  • Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Globally, an estimated 5% of adults suffer from depression.
  • Globally, one in seven 10-19-year-olds suffers from a mental disorder. Half of all such disorders begin by the age of 14, but most go undiagnosed and untreated.
  • People with severe mental disorders like schizophrenia typically die 10-20 years earlier than the general population.
  • One in 100 deaths is by suicide. It is the fourth leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29.
  • The COVID -19 pandemic has had a significant impact on people’s mental health.

The World Federation for Mental Health also addresses the disparity between mental health investment and overall health. On average, countries spend only 2% of their national health budgets on mental health. This has changed little in recent years. Despite the scale of mental illness, the gap between demand for mental health services and supply remains substantial. People with mental illness do not receive the health services they are entitled to and deserve, causing them to experience stigma and discrimination.
WFMH states, “Stigma and discrimination do not only affect people’s physical and mental health, stigma also affects their educational opportunities, current and future earning and job prospects, and also affects their families and loved ones. This inequality needs to be addressed because it should not be allowed to continue.”

The vision portrayed by WHO is a world where mental health is valued, promoted and protected. Where people affected by any of these disorders are able to exercise all their human rights and have access to high-quality health and social care.

The World Mental Health Day provides an opportunity for people to act together and highlight how inequality can be addressed to ensure that people can enjoy good mental health.

References:

https://wfmh.global/2021-world-mental-health-global-awareness-campaign-world-mental-health-day-theme/

https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240031029

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-mental-health-day/2021

https://www.who.int/key-messages

Monsenso signs two contracts with the Psychiatric Research Unit, Region West Zealand.

Monsenso signs two contracts with the Psychiatric Research Unit, Region West Zealand.

Monsenso signs two contracts with Research Unit for Psychotherapy and Psychopathology, Psychiatry West, Slagelse, Region Zealand Mental Health Services, who will use Monsenso’s digital health solution to remotely monitor patients with depression and schizotypal mental illness, respectively.

The first project, Development of an Intervention for Persistent Not on Track: DIP NOT, led by Jasmin Rejaye Gryesten, aims to identify non-responders to depression treatment, with the ultimate goal of increasing the number of remitted patients after CBT in the Danish MHS by developing a set of new person-centered add-on interventions to group CBT, to be used in case of observed lack of progress or deterioration.

The second project Phenomenologically informed PsychoTherapy for patients with Schizotypal Personality Disorder (PPT -SPD), is led by Kåre Donskov Nielsen and aims to develop and test new forms of phenomenological therapy that can help people with schizotypal mental illness.

About Monsenso digital health solution:
The Monsenso solution is a clinically validated, CE Class I Marked mHealth solution classified as a Medical Device, consisting of a smartphone app for patients and a clinical web portal for healthcare providers that are widely used in the prevention and treatment of common behavioural disorders such as depression and anxiety. It can also be configured to prevent and treat severe mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, PTSD, and schizophrenia. It is currently being used by over 1,000 patients across the globe and is highly valued by patients and healthcare providers.

For additional information contact:

Bettina van Wylich-Muxoll
Chief Marketing Officer
marketing@monsenso.com
Monsenso