UK National Schizophrenia Awareness Day 2022 – A mental illness in need of destigmatization

UK National Schizophrenia Awareness Day 2022 – A mental illness in need of destigmatization

July 25th is National Schizophrenia Awareness Day in the UK, aiming at shining light on “what it means to live with this much misunderstood and often stigmatized mental health condition”, fighting prejudice surrounding it, as well as seeking to raise awareness of and support for its treatment [1].

What is schizophrenia?
Individuals with schizophrenia experience disruptions in their thought processes and perceptions, as well as in social interactions and emotional responsiveness. The mental illness, usually including psychotic symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations, can be highly disabling to people suffering from it [2].

Economic costs of schizophrenia
Worldwide, around 24 million people are currently diagnosed with schizophrenia [3] – in the UK it is over 685.000 people (approximately 1% of the population) [4].
Schizophrenia has a large economic cost. It accounts for approximately “30% of all spending on adult mental health in the NHS” [5], estimated at 11.8 million GBP in England alone in 2012 [6]. Generally, it costs around 6 times as much to treat an individual with schizophrenia over its lifetime than it costs to treat a heart disease patient [5].

Stigmatization of schizophrenia
Schizophrenia affects all genders and individuals from all social backgrounds, and onsets most often in the late teenage years or in the early twenties [5]. The mental illness severely impacts affected peoples’ quality of life. In the UK, only around 13% of individuals suffering from schizophrenia are working [5], and it has been found that affected people are “2 to 3 times more likely to die early than the general population” [3]. Schizophrenia is also a significant burden that impacts productivity of family caregivers, who on average spend 22 hours a week for 15 years of their life taking care of their relative with schizophrenia.
Additionally, stigma against people suffering from the condition is still “intense and widespread” today [3]. Individuals with schizophrenia oftentimes experience social exclusion, and/or discrimination due to the disease, and some even experience limited “access to general health care, education, housing, and employment” [3]. According to the World Health Organization (2022), these issues often only exacerbate the suffering peoples’ symptoms [3].

What needs to change?
Schizophrenia is not as rare as one might think, and prejudices surrounding the illness unfortunately only further increase the burden of the disease on people suffering from it. It is therefore important to raise awareness about schizophrenia, destigmatize the mental illness, and help to ensure that individuals with schizophrenia are not facing discrimination. Given the high economic costs of schizophrenia, it is also important to continuously work on improving the treatment support provided. This includes seeking for new ways to help individuals suffering from the mental health condition.

How digital solutions for mental health can help
The use of digital platforms for remote patient monitoring and health assessment, as well as real-time patient analytics, could enable personalised treatment and improved quality of care [7]. Digital solutions for mental health could therefore offer the potential to empower and engage individuals with schizophrenia to better manage their mental health, facilitating treatment for clinical professionals and empowering family caregivers to help drive down economic costs and increase productivity.
At Monsenso, we have worked with schizophrenia in both research and clinical settings. Our digital mental health solution has helped many individuals with schizophrenia to better understand their conditions and live a more independent life, as well as helped clinicians to better support their patients. We are proud to support the National Schizophrenia Awareness Day in the UK and will continue to spread knowledge about the mental health condition and offer our support to individuals affected and clinicians providing treatment for the mental illness.
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About Monsenso
Monsenso is a digital health company that enables better outcomes for patients and clinicians through data-driven decisions. We are focused on mental health and user-centred in designing our solutions for patients and clinicians. Our cloud-based platform is a CE-marked medical device (Class 1, pending Class 2a and MDR certification) that is HIPAA compliant, with certifications in ISO 13485, ISO 27001, Cyber Essentials and TGA. Our solution has been clinically and scientifically validated by over 70+ peer-reviewed studies and can be configured for applications across mental health conditions. We work with healthcare systems, life sciences and research organisations globally. Book a demo to learn more.

References:
[1] Awareness Days (n.d.). National Schizophrenia Awareness Day 2022.
https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/national-schizophrenia-awareness-day-2022/#:~:text=National%20Schizophrenia%20Awareness%20Day%2C%20marked,with%20a%20diagnosis%20of%20schizophrenia.

[2] National Institute of Mental Health (n.d.). Schizophrenia.
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/schizophrenia#:~:text=Schizophrenia-,Definition,be%20both%20severe%20and%20disabling.

[3] World Health Organization (2022). Schizophrenia.
https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/schizophrenia#:~:text=Schizophrenia%20affects%20approximately%2024%20million,%25

[4] Royal College of Psychiatrists (2015). Schizophrenia.
https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mental-health/problems-disorders/schizophrenia

[5] Living With Schizophrenia (2017). Facts and Figures.
https://livingwithschizophreniauk.org/facts-and-figures/

[6] Ride, J., Kasteridis, P., Gutacker, N., Aragon Aragon, MJ., Jacobs, R. (2020). Healthcare Costs for People with Serious Mental Illness in England: An Analysis of Costs Across Primary Care, Hospital Care, and Specialist Mental Healthcare. Appl Health Econ Health Policy 18(2):177-188.
doi: 10.1007/s40258-019-00530-2.

[7] Elsevier Health (2022). Clinician of the Future Report 2022.
https://www.elsevier.com/connect/clinician-of-the-future

Top pain points in the delivery of mental healthcare and how digital technology can help

Top pain points in the delivery of mental healthcare and how digital technology can help

Close to 1 in 7 people suffer from a mental health condition [1], a leading cause of disability globally [2].
However, 75% of people with mental illnesses do not receive any treatment [3], highlighting the issue of access to mental healthcare, which has only been exacerbated by Covid.

The shortage of trained professionals in mental healthcare is a key contributor to the issue of access [4]. Patients are faced with long waiting queues to receive care [5], with no promise of quality care, given clinicians’ heavy caseload [4]. It is not uncommon that patients only receive 5 mins of clinicians’ time after months of waiting for the appointment [6]. Indeed, a large study by Elsevier Health (2022), involving over 2800 clinicians and nurses from 111 markets, found that almost 1 in 2 of clinicians globally (69% in Europe) admit that time they are able to devote to each individual patient is insufficient “to give them good care” [4].

Clearly, there are plenty of opportunities to improve patients’ access, speed to, and quality of care globally. Promisingly, the same study found that over half of the clinicians (56%) state that patients have become more empowered to manage their own conditions, and that clinicians (62%) expect a change in role towards being more in partnership with patients over the next decade. Given that mental health costs a whopping $16 trillion to the global economy by 2030 [7] and growing, there is an urgent need for solutions that are designed to tackle these issues in a scalable and cost-effective way.

The use of digital technology offers the potential to address this matter. In particular, the use of digital platforms for remote patient monitoring and health assessment could improve access and speed to care, and real-time patient analytics could enable personalised treatment and improved quality of care [4]. Ultimately, to fully benefit from such technology, patient data needs to be managed securely, the design of the solution should focus on the needs of its users, and it should be continually assessed on its ability to deliver value to patients and clinicians.

About Monsenso:
Monsenso is a digital health company that enables better outcomes for patients and clinicians through data-driven decisions. We are focused on mental health and user-centred in designing our solutions for patients and clinicians. Our cloud-based platform is a CE-marked medical device (Class 1, pending Class 2a and MDR certification) that is HIPAA compliant, with certifications in ISO 13485, ISO 27001, Cyber Essentials, and TGA. Our solution has been clinically and scientifically validated by over 70+ peer-reviewed studies and can be configured for applications across mental health conditions. We work with healthcare systems, life sciences, and research organisations globally. To learn more, visit www.monsenso.com

References:
[1] World Health Organization (2020). World Mental Health Day: an opportunity to kick-start a massive scale-up in investment in mental health.
https://www.who.int/news/item/27-08-2020-world-mental-health-day-an-opportunity-to-kick-start-a-massive-scale-up-in-investment-in-mental-health#:~:text=Mental%20health%20is%20one%20of,every%2040%20seconds%20by%20suicide.

[2] Wainberg, M. L., Scorza, P., Shultz, J. M., Helpman, L., Mootz, J. J., Johnson, K. A., Neria, Y., Bradford, J. E., Oquendo, M. A., & Arbuckle, M. R. (2017). Challenges and Opportunities in Global Mental Health: a Research-to-Practice Perspective. Current psychiatry reports 19(5): 28. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-017-0780-z.

[3] Marchildon, J. (2020). 4 Barriers to Accessing Mental Health Services Around the World.
https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/barriers-to-mental-health-around-the-world/.

[4] Elsevier Health (2022). Clinician of the Future Report 2022.
https://www.elsevier.com/connect/clinician-of-the-future.

[5] Royal College of Psychiatrist (2020). Two-fifths of patients waiting for mental health treatment forced to resort to emergency or crisis services.
https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/news-and-features/latest-news/detail/2020/10/06/two-fifths-of-patients-waiting-for-mental-health-treatment-forced-to-resort-to-emergency-or-crisis-services.

[6]. Becker, G., Kempf, D.E., Xander, C.J. et al. (2010). Four minutes for a patient, twenty seconds for a relative – an observational study at a university hospital. BMC Health Serv Res 10(94).
https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-10-94.

[7] Lancet Commission. (2018). Report: Mental illness will cost the world $16 trillion (USD) by 2030. Mental Health Weekly 28(39): 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1002/mhw.31630.

New research: Can smartphone data be a digital marker for discriminating bipolar disorder from unipolar disorder?

New research: Can smartphone data be a digital marker for discriminating bipolar disorder from unipolar disorder?

Unipolar disorder (UD) refers to individuals suffering from depression without experiencing mania, whereas individuals suffering from bipolar disorder (BD) usually face episodes of mania in addition to their depression [1]. Clinicians often encounter difficulties identifying whether depressed patients suffer from BD or UD. Given that the course of illness and related treatments vary for patients with BD and UD, the discrimination between these two disorders is critical [2].

A new research paper has just been published on “Differences in mobility patterns according to machine learning models in patients with bipolar disorder and patients with unipolar disorder” in the Journal of Affective Disorders [2].

This new research investigated whether using the information on activity and mobility of patients with BD and UD as supplementary objective measure could assist in the discrimination between the two conditions [2]. Data for this study has been collected as part of the RADMIS trials, two similarly composed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effect of daily smartphone-based monitoring including a clinical feedback loop in individuals suffering from BD and UD. The Monsenso digital health solution was used for the collection of smartphone-based patient data in the intervention group of the trials [3].

The present study included gathering both passively collected smartphone-based location data and patient-reported smartphone-based data on mood from 65 patients with BD and 75 patients with UD [2]. Smartphone-based self-assessments of mood were completed by all patients, and smartphone data on location reflecting mobility patterns, routine and location entropy (chaos) was collected passively from all patients on a continuous basis over the course of six months [2]. The data collection was followed by an extensive data analysis, comparing differences between the two groups.

Results of the study show patients suffering from BD have significantly lower mobility in, e.g., their total time of daily movement during depressive periods (eB 0.74, 95% CI 0.57; 0.97, p = 0.027). Additionally, the area under the curve (AUC) of location data was rather high in classifying patients with BD compared with patients with UD, although results of the study may be limited by relatively low symptom severity of the participating patients contributing to the dimension of the AUC [2].

The study results suggest alterations in location data may be a promising digital diagnostic marker in patients with BD and UD, and smartphone data on mobility patterns could hence help in discriminating between the two disorders. 

Mads Frost, PhD, Co-Founder & Chief Information Security Officer at Monsenso, who has contributed to the research says: “The work on comparing mobility patterns between patients with bipolar disorder and patients with unipolar disorder has been highly interesting, and we look forward to further explore our data looking for potential digital diagnostic markers”.

 “We are excited that Monsenso is a part of promising new research on digital diagnostic markers, and contributes to the research in and the treatment of mental health and neurological disorders”, says Thomas Lethenborg, CEO at Monsenso.

About Monsenso:
Monsenso is an innovative technology company offering a medical grade digital health solution. Our mission is to help provide better mental health to more people at lower costs. Our solution helps optimise the treatment of mental disorders and gives a detailed overview of an individual’s mental health through the collection of outcome, adherence, and behavioural data. It connects individuals, carers, and health care providers to enable personalised treatment, remote care, and early intervention. Based on continuous research and development, our team is committed to developing solutions that fit seamlessly into the lives of individuals, increase their quality of life and improve the efficacy of mental health treatment. To learn more, visit www.monsenso.com

Research publication:
You can find the research publication in the Journal of Affective disorders here.

References:
[1] Quilty, L., Pelletier, M., DeYoung, C.G. & Bagby, M. (2013). Hierarchical personality traits and the distinction between unipolar and bipolar disorders. Journal of Affective Disorders 147(1-3): 247-254. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032712007604#bib2

[2] Faurholt-Jepsen, M., Busk, J., Rohani D.A., Frost, M. Tønning, M.L., Bardram, J.E. & Kessing, L.V. (2022). Differences in mobility patterns according to machine learning models in patients with bipolar disorder and patients with unipolar disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders 306: 246-253. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032722003019?dgcid=author

[3] Faurholt-Jepsen, M., Tønning, M.L., Frost, M., Martiny, K., Tuxen, N., Rosenberg, N., Busk, J., Winther, O., Thaysen-Petersen, D., Aamund, K.A. & Tolderlund, L., Bardram, J.E. & Kessing, L.V. (2020). Reducing the rate of psychiatric re-admissions in bipolar disorder using smartphones—The RADMIS trial. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavia, 143(5): 453-465. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acps.13274

Norwegian hospital aims to reduce hospital readmissions of individuals with bipolar disorder

Norwegian hospital aims to reduce hospital readmissions of individuals with bipolar disorder

Copenhagen, Denmark – 15 November 2016.  Monsenso announced today that the Norwegian hospital, Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus, will begin a pilot study with the Monsenso mHealth solution that aims to reduce hospital readmissions of individuals with bipolar disorder. Lovisenberg was signed up as a customer by Computas, Monsenso’s partner in Norway.

The pilot study, which will include individuals with bipolar disorder, aims to reduce hospital readmissions by using the Monsenso mHealth solution to intervene at an early stage.

Thomas Lethenborg, CEO at Monsenso, said that Lovisenberg would conduct a ten-month pilot study to determine if the solution should be widely implemented with other mental illnesses.

“Lovisenberg is  committed to finding innovative solutions that help them provide better care to their patients in a more cost-efficient way. With the implementation of the Monsenso mHealth solution, a patient’s historical, aggregated data will be available more easily,” Mr Lethenborg added.

Kim Petersen, Executive Director at Computas AS, said “We are thrilled to have signed up our first customer with Monsenso.  This type of technology gives new opportunities for the integration of mobile health into the existing mental health services in Norway; and I am confident that once clinicians start experiencing the clinical and financial benefits of implementing the solution, we will sign up more customers in no time!”

 Andreas Joner, Head of Clinic at Lovisenberg, said the trial would allow them to investigate how a remote patient monitoring solution can be used to improve patient care and patient engagement.

“The Monsenso mHealth solution will help us to access and analyse data in a more efficient way. Besides, since most people carry their smartphones all the time, patients can answer their self-assessments and clinical questionnaires wherever they are, without feeling self-conscious,” said Andreas Joner.

The Monsenso mHealth solution for mental illnesses is based on a triple-loop treatment model that connects patients, carers and clinicians and has the potential to reduce hospital readmissions of bipolar patients.

Patients use a smartphone to fill in routine self-assessments that reveal their current state of mind and collect sensor data.  The smartphone app also works as a self-help tool that allows patients to manage their symptoms and the behaviours that trigger those symptoms. Carers are also given a smartphone that allows them to assess the overall well-being of the one they care for, and make notes that are shared with the patient and the clinician.

Clinicians use a web portal that provides historical information on each patient, including routine self-assessments and clinical questionnaires. The portal also allows them to obtain an overview of their patients’ illness progression, symptoms, medication compliance, and medical record keeping.

With more than 1300 employees, Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus delivers effective treatment and outpatient care across its multiple sites. The hospital provides specialist care in mental health.

For additional information contact:

Jennifer Highland
Marketing and Communications Manager
Monsenso
+45 81 71 7713
highland@monsenso.com

Tone Hærem
Communications Director
Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus
tone.harem@lds.no

Pål Vermund Knudsen
Sales Director
Computas AS
pal.vermund.knudsen@computas.com

About Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus
Lovisenberg Diaconal Hospital provides specialised health care services in mental health and internal medicine for 180,000 inhabitants of four City Districts in Oslo (inner city). In addition, mental health services are offered to several other city boroughs. The surgical department performs scheduled operations, and has one of the leading orthopaedic units in Norway. The hospital has 234 beds, more than 2,000 employees, and an extensive out-patient facility. It is a non-profit, privately owned organisation, all services provided are within Public Health. Our mission is to offer diagnostics, treatment, and follow up services of a high quality to all our patients, with equality and respect. Being innovative and finding new solutions is part of this.

About Computas
Computas is an international IT solutions provider based in Norway, delivering solutions all over the world. We deliver services and solutions for work processes and collaboration. Our core competence is systems development, architecture and integration, project management and consulting. We have unique experience, deliver high quality in all projects, and work closely with customers to make the best solutions. The health care system in Norway is changing, and there is a need for smart solutions that can ensure quality and improve the efficiency of health services. The key to solving these challenges is through better use of IT. We are prepared to contribute with our expertise and our solutions aimed at patients and health care workers.  We have delivered everything from work process solutions to apps to help the health sector to work more efficiently and to help patients to have better safety.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]You can download this article as PDF in EnglishDanish and Norwegian